Meet Seth Morabito: A man of many hats

Meet Seth Morabito: A man of many hats

There’s a renaissance man in our midst, here at Vibe. 

He makes technical magic happen; dabbles in linguistics; strikes a chord with musical musings; applauds Steve Martin (LA Story is one of his favorite movies of all time); embraces the nomad within; and crafts emulators for the fun of it. And when asked to describe himself, Vibe Founding40 member Seth Morabito says, “I’m passionate about learning. I always want to learn more.”

Mild-mannered with merry eyes, Seth alternates between being amusing and looking amused. He’s fond of absurdism and it shows.

 Seth is at home in Joshua Tree cactus circles and has got a flair for hats. “Is that a Fedora you’re wearing?” “This one is a Tilley that I picked up somewhere in California. I don’t tend to wear hats except in cold weather, but I sure do like them!”

Seth is at home in Joshua Tree cactus circles and has got a flair for hats. “Is that a Fedora you’re wearing?” “This one is a Tilley that I picked up somewhere in California. I don’t tend to wear hats except in cold weather, but I sure do like them!”

“I’m an absurdist. My favorite comedy act is probably Monty Python. These days, it’s stand-up comedian Patton Oswalt.”

A born and bred San Franciscan, Seth migrated north to Poulsbo three years ago, leaving behind all that is Bay Area (“a high-tech rate race”). He’s now a senior software engineer, working remotely for Cambridge, MA-based Akamai Technologies, following stints at Stanford University and Glyde Corporation.

Seth also launched Loom Communications in 1995, a contracting and software development company that’s home to his long-running blog.

“I got my start in software by building web pages at Cornell University,” Seth explains. “More recently, my focus has been on building scalable solutions to business problems using the best evolving technologies for the job. I’m partial to program design and architecture.”

In fact, Seth’s an explorer of the software landscape—yesterday’s and today’s. We’re not just talking about core technologies; we’re talking the big puzzles surrounding technologies of the past, recapturing them through emulation. That means running old software through mimicking the hardware of yesteryear.

“In a way, I’m kind of a historian. I’ve always been interested in the history of computers. It’s where I spend a lot of my time.”

From gigabytes to breakfast bites, get a step closer to the heart and mind of a fella who loves his craft and his calling. 
 

How did you make your way to Poulsbo from San Francisco? 
Seth: Friends on Bainbridge. During some of my trips up here to visit, I fell in love with the Kitsap Peninsula. It’s more, well, homey I guess is the right word.

Tell me about your blog. What's the impetus behind it?
Seth: I like to share and recount my investigations into the lifecycle of programming and its products. To give you an idea I've had an unhealthy love for the PDP-11 since college when I first laid hands on one that was destined for the scrappers. Some friends and I nursed it back to life and played with it over the course of a couple of semesters. When I was offered a complete PDP-11/35 last year, I jumped at the chance. Unfortunately, the machine had been left in a barn for over a decade and became infested with mice. It was severely damaged, but I spent a few months carefully restoring it.


Why does emulation hold such fascination for you? 
Seth: In computers, we have this very recent history really. They only came around in the 1950s, which isn’t that long ago. But we’ve lost a lot of that history. Those machines no longer exist and because they’re gone, software, say, from the ‘70s, doesn’t work anymore, either. But I’ve found ways to recreate such software, mimicking the machines so that it will run. The software doesn’t know the difference, so it’s like bringing it back from the dead. The value? Learning from our recent past. We don’t have to reinvent the wheel all the time—and it’s a way of not forgetting where we’ve been.


You love the design aspect of your work, it seems.
Seth: To me, software programming is like sculpting. You know that somewhere in there is the solution, the art of it, and it’s your job to find it, express it, share it. You may start with something that’s rough and inelegant and doesn’t quite look right. But by whittling it down, constantly chiseling away, the solution is revealed.


Vibe: What do you see as the next big 'wow' on the technology front?
Seth:
 A lot of people are really hot on blockchain, but I’m not. What really interests me right now is Artificial Intelligence (AI). It’s really making a comeback. My only fear is that like last time, when we had the first really big push, people will get their hopes up too high. The ‘80s became known as the “AI Winter” in computer circles. That’s because people got so excited about  developments, all the advances, but then they hit a brick wall. Funding dried up; the government didn’t want to pay for it anymore.


What about new innovations like the Tesla, which is not only self-driving, but also appears to be self-igniting(?!) 
Seth: I kind of worry now that something similar is happening with self-driving cars. For example, we’ve made really amazing progress and it feels like they’re right around the corner. But we’re starting to run up against some hard problems that may not be solvable. Most common issues cited: the noisiness and chaos of a real street vs. a closed course used for training. Sure, you can design a car to self-drive a course’s downtown Mountain View streets, but when you expose it to real-world scenarios, it gets really confused.

To me, software engineering is like sculpting. You know that somewhere in there is the art of it, and it’s your job to find it, express it, share it. You may start with something that’s rough and inelegant… But by whittling it down, constantly chiseling away, the solution is revealed.

Share with us a highlight of your career. 
Seth: There certainly have been very exciting points along the way. I’m very happy doing what I do. I’m jazzed by it. Being in the trenches, helping in a crisis—I love that.
 

What's the most necessary quality of being a creative driver in software programming?
Seth:
 Persistence, not giving up. Curiosity. And love of puzzles. Because there are a lot of them.


You say you're 'never happy standing still'. What do you mean by that?
Seth: When you’re stagnating in programming, in your career, you’re doing the same thing over and over, it gets really boring. It’s always important to keep prompting yourself, learning and executing new ways that you haven’t thought of before. I try to avoid that in regular life, too, not getting stuck in ruts. I think that comes from moving around a lot when I was a kid. We never really settled down, so I was constantly exposed to new avenues, fresh experiences. I have a lot of wanderlust.


Rumor has it you were a linguistics major in college?  
Seth: It [linguistics] just captured my fancy. The study of how we use language, how it works underneath the hood. And that’s what really fascinated me, comparing languages to one another and learning how they change over time.


How many languages do you speak? 
Seth: 
Je parle a smattering of French, but my core languages would be (he grins)… Java, C, C++, Rust, Python, Ruby, Clojure, and JavaScript. I'm constantly on the lookout for new languages and technologies that can help solve software problems. I was also an exchange student for a while on an Icelandic farm, about a half hour from Reykjavik. The natural beauty there is phenomenal, just otherworldly.


I hear you're into traditional hand bookbinding, too? 
Seth: The book is an object that is fantastic. When I was growing up, I didn’t really think about that—of books as actual objects. I just read everything I could get my hands on. Then one day, I came across bookbinding in the encyclopedia. It was “Oh, yeah,” you actually do make a book. So, I went to the North Bennet School in Boston. It’s one of the only premier craft, trade, and artisan centers in the US specifically dedicated to the traditional techniques of bookbinding by hand.


What's on your summer reading list? 
Seth: I read a lot of nonfiction books about programming, but I just started Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff. He's one of my favorite authors.


Favorite beverage of choice?
Seth: I really like the Ridgetop Red [beer] from Silver City Brewery.


What's your best advice to aspiring entrepreneurs and people starting out in their careers?
Seth: Find something that rubs you the wrong way and find out how to fix it. Because if it rubs you, it rubs others, and that’s a market that you can wedge yourself into.

Find something that rubs you the wrong way and find out how to fix it. Because if it rubs you, it rubs others, and that’s a market that you can wedge yourself into.

You are a founding member here at Vibe, joining the community long before the physical space even existed. Name 3 characteristics of the community and space that have surprised you.
Seth:
 Openness. Passion. Energy. The openness has delighted me quite a bit. Just the fact that we’re not all huddled or isolated in our work. We’re free to communicate with one another. The passion that Vibe has brought to the work/life balance. And it’s got good energy.


Local elections are coming up on August 7, another thing that you're very passionate about. What's your message?
Seth: Everybody—I don’t care what party you’re affiliated with—everybody should vote. It’s hard to get that message across. People feel unmotivated, hopeless, or overwhelmed, but it’s the one thing you can really do to make a difference.


And last but not least, fill in this blank: the Pacific NW makes your heart race because...
Seth: The beauty. The natural beauty. I love the mountains. Just seeing the mountains every day.

 


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Meet the author: Vibist Susan O'Meara is a Poulsbo-based freelance writer, editor and journalist with global experience. Back in the day, Susan did event marketing for the electrified Don King, boxing’s bad-boy biz whiz. Then she got roped into writing and producing TV spots for Love Boat: The Next Wave, the ‘90s reboot, and nonfiction programming for Showtime (e.g., Roswell: The Real Story). She's not sure which was more surreal—going with the flow of those Hollywood highs, so to speak, or navigating Nairobi’s magazine scene. Susan has worked in the US and abroad for the likes of Bloomberg Media, Deloitte, Discovery Communications, and the United Nations. She's obsessed with wrangling language and messaging that helps brands, businesses, and individuals to grow and shine. Except when it comes to Don King's hair.

 

Coworking meets preschool in Poulsbo

Coworking meets preschool in Poulsbo

An exciting new collaboration between Vibe Coworks and Magnolia Forest Preschool means working parents in Kitsap now have more flexibility than ever before.

Like many things here at Vibe, our brand new partnership with Magnolia Forest Preschool stems from a place that’s intensely personal.

Starting July 1, all Vibe members with a monthly membership of 5 days/month or more will receive a 10% discount on Magnolia Forest Preschool and summer camps.

Yes, starting July 1, all Vibe members with a monthly membership of 5 days/month or more will receive a 10% discount on enrollment at Magnolia Forest Preschool and summer camps. Talk about perks. That’s uber exciting in its own right. But really, this is a partnership that represents so much more than a cost savings to those of us who want the very best for our kids: it also represents a happier, healthier, more connected approach to the way we live+work here in the beautiful PNW.

You see, beyond my role as cofounder of Vibe Coworks, I’m also mom to two of the world’s smartest, funniest, most adorable 3.5 year old twin girls. I love my kids. I love my career. And I’m stubborn enough to believe that no one should have to give one up for the other.

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So stubborn, in fact, that our original vision of Vibe Coworks included an on-site but separate childcare facility. We moved away from that model for a number of reasons, but we never moved away from our dream of helping parents, professionals and especially moms here in Kitsap achieve the work+life integration that so many of us dream of.  

I love my kids. I love my career. And I’m stubborn enough to believe that no one should have to give one up for the other.
— Alanna Imbach, Cofounder, Vibe Coworks

I know I’m not alone in this. Many Vibe members have young families of their own. Many want-to-be members have told us they’d love to work here… if only they could find the childcare and preschool solutions they need in order to be able to juggle an out-of-home career—and stay sane while doing so.

Enter Poulsbo and Gig Harbor residents Brandyn Boyd and Jenny Stokes: passionate teachers, early learning advocates and entrepreneurs who, together, have launched Magnolia Forest Preschool, Poulsbo’s first 100% outdoor preschool.

With programs running three, four, or five days per week for kids ages 2.5 - 6 years old, Jenny and Brandyn have created a school run on the belief that children are drawn to experience, to learning, and to each other.

They describe Magnolia as a place to explore, assert independence, take risks and overcome fearsa place that inspires curiosity, wonder, possibilities, imagination, motion, contemplation, exploration and gales of laughter’.

Sound familiar? That’s probably because it’s just about the same the way we describe what it’s like to be a member of Vibe, too. No matter who you are, or how old you are, we believe everyone needs that supportive tribe of champions, pushing us on in pursuit of our passions, dreams and wildest aspirations.

We’re thrilled to be able to partner with a place like Magnolia Forest Preschool to provide Vibe members with a 10% discount on their preschool and summer camp programs, and we’re actively on the lookout for additional collaborations with businesses and organizations that help all of us live+work in happier, healthier more connected ways. They say it takes a village. Our village starts here.

Welcome to the Vibe family, Magnolia!

 "Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood." — Fred Rogers This photo and cover image:  Stand in the Sun Photography

"Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning. But for children play is serious learning. Play is really the work of childhood." — Fred Rogers
This photo and cover image: Stand in the Sun Photography


Meet the Kingston woman helping local moms stay stronger than ever

Meet the Kingston woman helping local moms stay stronger than ever

 For those times when mamas feel defeated and belly up, Kingston business owner Jill Sinkula paves the path back to self awareness. Through her work at  Belly Up Fitness , local women are setting the track for longevity and healthy stamina that encourage successful labor and quick recovery. 

For those times when mamas feel defeated and belly up, Kingston business owner Jill Sinkula paves the path back to self awareness. Through her work at Belly Up Fitness, local women are setting the track for longevity and healthy stamina that encourage successful labor and quick recovery. 

Sunny spring days are here, which means many of us are getting inspired to get outside, get in shape and PLAY in this spectacular PNW wonderland we love and call home. Of course, for Vibist Jill Sinkula of Belly Up Fitnesseveryday is a great day to get moving, especially if you're a mama. 

Sound impossible? Not if you ask this entrepreneur. With two tiny humans by her side, Jill infuses her days with an educated balance as she runs her health-driven business from the same Kingston address where she dedicates herself as wife and mommy, illustrating the power of our modern day super moms and proving that exercise can always find a place amidst family life. 

As if that were not cool enough, Jill has recently teamed up with fellow Vibe member Raquel Pappas of Kitsap Hot Yoga to host a special FREE workshop for moms on how to protect your core and pelvic floor. Did someone say passionate business leaders meeting at Vibe and going on to do rad things together? **Swoon.**  

Vibe: You’ve been active professionally within the fitness industry for a long time. What was that ‘ah-ha’ moment when you knew that this was an area of work that you felt passionate about?
JS: I worked with a prenatal fitness instructor when I was pregnant with my son. The work I did with her was empowering. I wanted to support women in the same capacity. That’s where my “third baby” Belly Up, came from.


Vibe: What’s your favorite thing about being a certified prenatal and postpartum coach?
JS: Working with amazing women and empowering them to take control of their fitness journey.   


Vibe: For those who aren’t familiar, what are some of the benefits of maternal fitness?
JS:
Women who exercise during and after pregnancy are at a lower risk of developing depression. Other benefits include; decreased risk of developing gestational diabetes, increases brain activity and maturity of brain function in baby, and women are %75 less likely to need medical intervention during delivery.


Vibe: Talk to us about the clients you serve. Are there any favorite stories you can share?
JS: I witness a lot of tears and laughter with my clients. Not necessarily because of the workout, but because of the overwhelming nature of parenthood. I can’t say I have “one” favorite story. But having someone tell you “you” were the best part of their day, assures me I’m doing something right.

I witness a lot of tears and laughter with my clients. Not necessarily because of the workout, but because of the overwhelming nature of parenthood.


Vibe: If you could offer one piece of advice to expecting or new moms regarding their physical health and wellness, what would it be?
JS: Most importantly, allow your body to rest and recover. If something is uncomfortable don’t push through, either modify it or cut it out entirely.
 

Vibe: What’s one problem you see within your industry or day-to-day work that you wish there were a solution for?
JS: I wish insurance companies would see the value in the type of work I do. Everyone should have access to programs that improve their health and well-being.


Vibe: Talk to us about this free event you have coming up that we’re so excited about, co-hosted in collaboration with Vibe member Raquel Pappas, of Kitsap Hot Yoga (KHY). 
JS: I’m thrilled to partner with KHY for the upcoming Belly Up Fitness workshop. I understand working with a personal trainer isn’t in everyone's budget; this is a way for me to share important information with women who need it most, mamas!
 

Vibe: Some people might be surprised that a fitness coach is a member of a coworking space. Talk to us about why you decided to join Vibe, and what you love about being here.
JS: I believe ideas grow from “good” to “great” when bounced off of others. Sharing a space with individuals working in different fields is the best way to improve your ideas or come up with new ones.
 

Vibe: We’ve seen a lot of young families moving to this area lately, and know that you have a strong network with events, activities and services that cater to them. What’s one piece of advice that you would offer to new families moving to Kitsap?
JS: I was born in Tacoma, graduated from Gig Harbor high school and spent a year working in Australia as an au pair before settling in Seattle for university. In December 2016, my family and I moved across the pond, ready to escape the chaos that comes with city life, and have easier access to all things outdoors. We love it here! 

I believe ideas grow from “good” to “great” when bounced off of others. Sharing a space [like Vibe Coworks] with individuals working in different fields is the best way to improve your ideas or come up with new ones.

Before my husband and I closed on our house I created several Facebook posts inquiring about schools, events, and running groups. I even created a FB group named Kingston Parents. I learned a ton of great information and felt like a member of the community before we even arrived. For anyone new moving to the area like we did, my advice would absolutely be to show up to local events or create your own!


Vibe: What are you passionate about, beyond work?
JS:  Living an active life, and empowering women!


Vibe: Final question: you’ve been talking about how fun it would be to have a Vibe running club. Are you going to help get that kicked off? (We'd LOVE that!)
JS: YES!
 

Vibe: Anything else you’d like to get off your chest?
JS: Circling back to fitness. Don’t skip working out because the baby is crying, and your toddler is jumping all over you. Instead, strap on the baby and involve your toddler in your workout. Not only will you feel better afterward, but you will teach your children the importance of exercise and self-care.

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6 Month Startup Kitsap now open to region's founders and innovators

6 Month Startup Kitsap now open to region's founders and innovators

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POULSBO—Registration is now open for 6 Month Startup Kitsap, an acclaimed monthly meetup that develops founders as they develop their business. Developed by tech-entrepreneur, venture capitalist and author, Dave Parker, the inaugural Kitsap cohort kicks off June 6 in Poulsbo, and is the first time the program has been made available outside of Seattle.

Over the course of the six month series, aspiring founders, corporate innovators, transitioning military service members and their spouses, digital nomads and students will refine their big idea, understand how to make money, and make an informed decision about whether to leave their day job and pursue this idea full-time. The 6 Month Startup format includes content, exercises, time to pitch, feedback from mentors and dinner.

“As a veteran tech exec and long-time commuter, I'm excited to to help facilitate the Kitsap cohort of Dave’s program. I believe we have founders and talent that can change the world living right here in our county, and 6 Month Startup Kitsap is practical, action-oriented means of bringing those people together,” said Brett Eddy, founder of Ignition Garage LLC and longtime Kitsap resident.

The inaugural 6 Month Startup Kitsap program begins Wednesday, June 6, and meets from 6:30 - 9:30pm at Vibe Coworks on the first Wednesday of every month through November 7. Participants should be prepared to do actual work on their ‘big idea’ and participate at every session. This work prepares them to receive honest and constructive feedback during group sessions with experienced mentors who have committed to sharing their time and expertise.

“The 6 Month Startup program and forthcoming book are designed to help founders learn from others’ experience at the earliest stage of their journey,” said 6 Month Startup founder and author, Dave Parker.
“Our mission is to help founders navigate the early stages of a startup with speed, experience and minimum personal trauma. We’re delighted to launch our first new city in Poulsbo, and look forward to learning more about the big ideas growing throughout Kitsap and the greater West Sound region.”

Program sponsors to date include Dave Parker LLC, Ignition Garage LLC, Heed CXO, Vibe Coworks and the Kitsap Economic Development Alliance. Additional sponsors and business leaders are also being sought to support the program. To view the program curriculum, learn more and sign up, visit StartupKitsap.com.

Ready to turn your great idea into a great business? Start here.

Ready to turn your great idea into a great business? Start here.

You've know what they say: ideas are cheap; execution is everything.

But what if you're still perfecting the idea? What if you aren't sure how to execute? Or what if you're itching to find your tribe of fellow entrepreneurs, innovators, mentors and role models? Ideas may be cheap, and execution everything, but only the ignorant go it alone.

That's why we're shaking-in-our-boots excited about 6 Month Startup, a new six-month program that we'll be hosting here at Vibe starting Wednesday, June 6. Farewell half-baked ideas. Hello strategic roadmap for making epic dreams both successful and real.

So what is 6 Month Startup?

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6 Month Startup is a program and forthcoming book designed to help you avoid failure and navigate your way through common problems and mistakes as a founder. Created by Seattle-based tech entrepreneur, venture capitalist and serial board member, Dave Parker, 6 Month Startup is for people big on passion, ideas, grit and humility. 

How do we know? Because we've experienced the rigor, wisdom and magic of the Seattle program first-hand, and couldn't be more excited about making it available right here in our own backyard. 

Over the course of six months, 6 Month Startup Kitsap will help you—as an aspiring or repeat founder, corporate innovator or student: 

  • confirm that your ideas are worthwhile;
  • find potential cofounders;
  • add structure to your corporate goals;
  • meet potential team members who are excited by innovation; and
  • learn process and structure for thinking about new ideas.

You’ll define and refine your big idea, understand how to make money with it and make an informed decision about whether to leave your day job. The monthly session format includes content, exercises, time to pitch, feedback from mentors and dinner.

The inaugural Kitsap cohort will be led by Brett Eddy, a seasoned executive that helps companies drive revenue through smart application of technology. You can read more about the program and the rational behind it on Dave's website here: 6monthstartup.com.

Here's how it works

 

 

  • Register via Eventbrite for each of the six 6 Month Startup Kitsap monthly sessions. (Each session: $20 Students / $35 Founders)
     
  • Join us on the 1st Wednesday of each month from 6:30 - 9:30, June - November at Vibe Coworks.
     
  • Do your homework each month. The result of that homework will be the key to meeting with experienced business mentors at each session. This is your startup idea and the pace at which you approach the homework is up to you, however mentors require that you have a serious idea and are doing the work each month to merit their generosity of time and expertise. Don't waste it.
     
  • Have fun, dig in and find a powerful circle of support!


Think this is just a new-fangled one-off? Think again.

Together with many of our friends and neighbors here in Kitsap, we've got a serious vision for introducing, connecting, supporting and expanding an entrepreneurial ecosystem here in the West Sound region in a way that has global reach. 6 Month Startup Kitsap is part of that, Vibe Coworks is part of that and so are a whole **slew** of other organizations, programs, events and talented neighbors. It's a nascent work in progress, but head on over to startupkitsap.com to see what else is growing around this place we call home.

Poulsbo's Jennie Hoffman helps us all adapt to climate change

Poulsbo's Jennie Hoffman helps us all adapt to climate change

 Vibist Jennie Hoffman is an accomplished researcher, author, nonprofit founder, and climate adaptation consultant, helping to connect science with management and policy.

Vibist Jennie Hoffman is an accomplished researcher, author, nonprofit founder, and climate adaptation consultant, helping to connect science with management and policy.

When Jennie walked into Vibe for the first time, we were instantly drawn to her energy, enthusiasm and passion for life. As we've gotten to know her more, we're also massively impressed by her superpower as someone who can make even the most complex of problems seem solvable.  

A Poulsbo resident, Jennie began studying the effects of global change in 1992 as a toxicologist, carrying this perspective to the University of Washington where she earned a Ph.D. in marine ecology. While she began graduate school with the intention of pursuing an academic career, she eventually decided she'd rather save the world.

We're OK with that (superpowers, remember?). And as we celebrate Earth Month this April, we couldn't think of anyone better to share their perspective on all things climate, here in Kitsap and beyond. 


Vibe: Jennie, you’ve been working in the world of climate change adaptation for over a decade, in the US and internationally. What was that ‘ah-ha’ moment when you knew that this was an area of work that you felt passionate about?
Jennie: There wasn’t a single “ah-ha” moment. I got interested in climate change effects on organisms and ecosystems way back in my days as a toxicologist and marine biologist, but I’d say my journey to becoming an “adaptationista” began when I was offered a great opportunity to work with a friend on climate change adaptation at the global level.

I’ve always cared about the well-being of people and the environment, and this work addressed both. The more I worked and talked with people around the globe, the clearer the myriad challenges posed climate change became. It’s certainly not the only challenge facing people and natural systems, and it’s not always the most critical challenge, but its influences are so pervasive!

People seemed to feel more perplexed by climate change than by many other stressors, perhaps because it was a newer issue, or perhaps because it was generally presented as a global rather than as a local threat. Whatever the case, I found that I was able to help people think through the problem, bring global changes into local or regional contexts, and to come up with solutions. Boy does it feel good to make a difference for other people! Plus, the people I worked with on climate adaptation were so passionate about making a difference—that was really inspiring.


Vibe: In your book, Climate Savvy, you talk about how climate change can be used an an opportunity to work toward a more robust future. What do you mean by that?
Jennie: It’s easy to get stuck doing things the way we’ve always done them; sometimes it takes a major challenge like climate change to get us out of that rut. I had a conversation a few years back with a city planner about how 90% of his city was within the 100-year flood plain and he had no way locate emergency services, schools, or other important buildings out of harm’s way.

Taking our vision for our communities and our core values as a starting point, we can then consider what could happen in terms of climate change and position ourselves and our community to avoid negative consequence and to take advantage of opportunities.

He said he wished city planners 50 or 75 years ago had made decisions that left him with better options. His hope was that 50 or 75 years from now people wouldn’t be looking back at him thinking the same thing!

Thinking about climate change had gotten him thinking about future planners, future residents of his town, and what he could do now that would keep his city safe,  productive, and a great place to live for the long haul.

You don’t have to know exactly what’s going to happen in terms of the climate or anything else to make good plans. We don’t know when a tsunami might hit the coast of Washington, or when or where a major earthquake will hit our region, but we have plans and policies in place to manage those risks.

Because climatic changes influence so many aspects of our lives—changes in the frequency and severity of floods, droughts, and wildfires can affect food costs and availability, access to wilderness for recreation, and people’s safety in their own homes, for example—bringing climate change into our planning pushes us to think about how to create systems that are resilient in the face all sorts of challenges.

What if summers become a lot warmer and dryer? Should we think about different crops we could grow to sustain our local food system? Be ready for more tourists? Improve water efficiency across the board so we’re less likely to be faced with restrictions or conflicts if we’re hit with some particularly dry years? Taking our vision for our communities and our core values as a starting point, we can then consider what could happen in terms of climate change and position ourselves and our community to avoid negative consequence and to take advantage of opportunities.


Vibe: You do a lot of training across the country for people from federal, state, tribal, municipal and nonprofit organizations, all around integrating climate change into their work. Do you have a favorite story from a training session that you could share? Are there any particularly memorable discussions, people or ideas that have come out of your trainings?
Jennie: One of my favorite comments from a participant in a vulnerability assessment training was “I still don’t know what I’m going to do, but now I’m confident that I can do it.” To me, that’s the key! There’s no magic bullet for climate change adaptation, so folks need to be comfortable thinking about how to bring climate considerations into their plans and decisions.

Another experience I’ve had is when people come in wanting to debate the science of climate change, to argue about what’s causing it, about how certain we are. I enjoy those conversations because it gets right to the heart of the issue: what do we need to know and how certain do we need to be before we do anything? It’s like a lot of other risk management situations, and helping people to recognize that sidesteps some of the overly politicized aspects of climate change.


Vibe: Talk to us about EcoAdapt, the nonprofit that you co-founded back in 2008. Why did you start it? What have the greatest successes been? What have you been doing since you moved on?
Jennie: Some friends and I had been working at a large environmental non-profit and had gotten pretty disillusioned with it. Success was measured in terms of fundraising and image rather than progress on environmental on social issues, and we just weren’t getting the support and buy-in we needed from our organization. Also, it felt strange to be focused on climate change and yet be flying all over the globe building up a massive carbon footprint, to be focused on other places and people but not doing much here at home.

Take a conscious approach to your life and work. Instead of saying “I have to” say “I’m choosing to,” and then ask yourself why you’re making the choices you make.

So we decided to start our own adaptation-focused organization with a focus on North America. It was an incredible experience, building a non-profit organization from start-up to a million-dollar budget in just a few years. EcoAdapt has become a leader in climate change adaptation.

We developed the Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (CAKE), a geo-referenced repository of adaptation case studies and resources that’s become a key resource for the U.S. National Climate Assessment. We also started the bi-annual National Adaptation Forum, which is attended by hundreds of people. And the EcoAdapt team is amazing. It was a hard decision to leave the group, but I knew I had more to offer than I was able to at EcoAdapt.

Since leaving, I’ve focused on building out three aspects of my work: training and capacity-building around climate-informed decision making, research and synthesis around specific needs or topics, and targeted consulting. I’m particularly excited about some projects focused on integrating climate considerations into existing decision and planning pathways related to the Endangered Species Act and to management plans for federally controlled resources.


Vibe: What role does technology play in how you run and grow your business, and in the world of climate adaptation more generally?
Jennie: Because I work with people all over the country (and internationally sometimes as well), I rely on a range of programs to stay in touch, share documents, give presentations, and host webinars. I also lead the occasional on-line training. While the technology I use isn’t fancy, it’s essential to my business.

In the world of climate adaptation more generally, technology is a double-edged sword. There can be a tendency to focus on technological solutions to the exclusion of people-based or nature-based solutions. For example, responses to decreasing supplies of fresh water could include increased water efficiency and conservation (people-focused), increased aquifer recharge through wetland restoration, protection of recharge areas, and minimizing impervious surface (nature-based), and desalination plants (technology-based).

Desalination plants may have their place, but they cost a lot more than the other options, create more localized environmental problems than the other options, and because of their carbon footprint they actually contribute to climate change and the very problem of water insecurity!

That said, technology can be really helpful for decreasing vulnerability to climate change. For example, all of the technology behind improved weather forecasts and climate models, such as satellites and supercomputers, allows farmers to make better decisions about what crops and equipment to invest in and municipal planners to make better decisions about infrastructure design and location.


Vibe: Your very first experience at Vibe was on a Free First Friday, when you also opted to join in for one of our most popular monthly meetups, Startups & Internet Innovators, hosted by Brett Eddy with Ignition Garage. What were some of your first impressions of the community here?
Jennie: It was love at first sight! I run my business out of my home, which is great in terms of flexibility but not so great in terms of face-to-face interaction. I’ve spent some quality time working at local cafes (hello, Caffe Cocina and Coffee Oasis!) and various public libraries, but that’s not the same as being in a coworking space.

 The  Startup & Internet Innovators  meetup is free and open to public on the 1st Friday of every month from 3 - 5pm at Vibe.

The Startup & Internet Innovators meetup is free and open to public on the 1st Friday of every month from 3 - 5pm at Vibe.

Vibe was exactly what I was looking for—close to home and full of friendly people working in a diversity of industries interested in sharing their experiences. I loved that there were several different kinds of chairs and that there was a way for people to vote on which one they liked! And Brett’s meetup was amazing.

I wanted a coworking situation where I could feel pushed and supported and inspired by people working to create successful businesses, be they sole proprietorships or something more, and Brett’s meet-up nailed it.
 


Vibe: Talk to us about the clients you serve. Are there any favorite stories you can share?
Jennie: I work with a diversity of clients, which I enjoy. Some clients are super-smart academically-minded conservation biologists. Others are community members with little formal training in science. My clients come from county, state, and federal governments, from the military and from natural resource agencies, from tribes, from industry—it’s great!

Part of what I like about working with a wide range of people is the insight it gives me into the wide array of values and viewpoints in our human family. When I was working on a project in Madagascar someone from an international aid agency had complained to me that locals weren’t using the solar cookstoves the agency was providing.

She couldn’t understand why this was, given that the cookstoves solved so many problems—they meant people didn’t have to hike for miles to get wood and didn’t have to deal with the poor air quality associated with turning that wood into charcoal, and if people used solar rather than charcoal cookstoves it would make such a difference in terms of saving and restoring Madagascar’s forests!

When I mentioned this to someone who’d been living in Madagascar for decades, he laughed and said the problem was that you couldn’t burn your rice in a solar cookstove. Say what??? It turns out that in Madagascar burnt rice water, knows as ranovola, is an incredibly popular beverage. You cook your rice, scoop out what you can, then add water to the burnt rice that’s left on the bottom of the pan and let it sit for a few hours. So, any stove that makes it hard to burn your rice is a non-starter there.


Vibe: If you could offer one piece of advice to families / businesses / cities that are wishing to be more environmentally savvy in their day-to-day, what would it be?
Jennie: Take a conscious approach to your life and work. Instead of saying “I have to” say “I’m choosing to,” and then ask yourself why you’re making the choices you make. For example, lots of event organizers feel like they “have to” provide bottled water for guests and speakers. Why is that? Why not provide pitchers of water instead? Or if you feel like you “have to” buy single-serving sizes of yogurt, snackables, or other individually-packaged food items—why is that? Is it the convenience? The fact that your kids prefer it that way? What could you do to maintain the convenience or the kids’ buy-in that didn’t send pounds and pounds of plastic into landfills?

I have friends who’ve gotten bento boxes for their kids’ lunches, and their kids love it. And what does it say about your life if you “don’t have time” to put yogurt from a bigger container into a smaller container that you take for lunch? We all make trade-offs all the time, so the idea isn’t to be perfect. The idea is to be aware of the tradeoffs you’re making, and to think about how to live in ways that are a better match for your own ideals.

I get energized by being around people who are actively creating or running their own small businesses. I also get good tips about local resources and how to run my own business in a way that works for me. I think the West Sound has been waiting for something like Vibe to catalyze connections and to make this a viable place to be an entrepreneur.


Vibe: How do you think being at Vibe Coworks will impact your business, and the world of work for local creatives, entrepreneurs and remote workers in Poulsbo and throughout the West Sound Region? 
Jennie: Jim Rohn wrote that “You are the average of the five people you most associate with.” Being at Vibe gets me spending more time with people who are working to build local and regional community, who are enthusiastic about supporting others, and who are taking less traditional approaches to their work lives. It’s inspiring!

I get energized by being around people who are actively creating or running their own small businesses. I also get good tips about local resources and how to run my own business in a way that works for me. I think the West Sound has been waiting for something like Vibe to catalyze connections and to make this a viable place to be an entrepreneur.

Vibe: What’s your favorite thing about Poulsbo/Kitsap/the Pacific Northwest?
Jennie: I love taking ferries, and seeing Mount Baker and Mount Rainier from the ferry. I love all the yummy berries you can pick—the salmon berries, thimble berries, native blackberries, salal, evergreen huckleberries, red huckleberries. This being spring, I’ve been enjoying the flowers—trillium, avalanche lilies, fritillaria, the native plums. I love that Kitsap is a “purple” county, i.e. that it’s politically mixed. I love the salmon. I love the vibrant Native American presence and how this connects us to the deeper history of this region.

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Vibe: What do you see as being the most critical climate adaptation opportunity facing us here in our county?
Jennie: Keep it local. Having abundant local food means we’re less vulnerable to big droughts and floods elsewhere, and reduces our carbon footprint. Locally generated power (e.g. rooftop solar) means we’re less vulnerable to power disruptions from big storms, droughts, or other factors. And strengthening local and regional community makes it more possible to tackle big challenges that might come our way.

As a coastal county we do need to think about sea level rise and how to balance the desire to protect property from erosion with the need for healthy marine ecosystems. There’s been a tendency to put up seawalls or to otherwise harden shorelines to limit erosion, but this isn’t necessarily the best approach. Costs just keep increasing over time, and hard shorelines reduce habitat for crabs and shellfish as well as the forage fish that are key to healthy salmon populations.

Keeping infrastructure out of erosion zones in the first place is a great option, and counties, cities, and the State can do a lot in terms of regulations and incentives to make this happen. Another option is green shorelines (e.g. Green Shores for Homes) which balance infrastructure protection with ecosystem health and aesthetics. Keeping healthy intertidal ecosystems supports the local food system and keeps our coasts beautiful!


Vibe: What are you passionate about, beyond work?
Jennie:
Gardening! Hiking! Local agriculture! Social justice! Helping people in need! Dogs! I recently started volunteering with North Kitsap Fishline, which is an AMAZING organization.

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Restoring sanity, serenity and the environment, one house at a time

Restoring sanity, serenity and the environment, one house at a time

All across the globe, April means Earth month. This year, it's our 48th annual reminder that this little planet of ours is definitely one worth loving on. With all things green on the brain, it also seemed like a pretty perfect chance to take a look at some of the eco-forward things Vibe members are doing to protect and preserve this beautiful place we call home.

Michelle Day, founder of Kitsap Clean, is the perfect example. Want to talk about the health benefits, cost savings and value of going green when it comes to cleaning products and practices in your home? Michelle is your gal.

 Avid environmentalist and technology advocate Michelle Day is the founder and owner of  Kitsap Clean , one of the region's top home cleaning companies dedicated to eco-friendly and socially responsible practices.

Avid environmentalist and technology advocate Michelle Day is the founder and owner of Kitsap Clean, one of the region's top home cleaning companies dedicated to eco-friendly and socially responsible practices.

Vibe: Cleaning isn’t usually the first thing people think about when deciding on a career path. What inspired you to become a leader within the cleaning industry, ultimately founding your own company?
MD: House cleaning is definitely an in-demand service for the Kitsap area, and I had considerable experience working in hotel housekeeping while in college. Kitsap Clean was born out of my interests in environmental issues, technology (website design, in particular) and previous experience in the cleaning industry.

Vibe: You mention your interest in technology. What role does that play in how you run and grow your business?
MD: Technology has played a crucial role in allowing our company to grow. We were the first cleaning company in the area that offered online booking on our website, and we use several apps that allow us to communicate more effectively with our clients. Thanks to the apps we use, our clients receive real time updates, telling them when our teams are on their way and when the job is done. Clients can also view and pay their bill electronically with the tap of a button.  

Vibe: You’ve recently joined Vibe as a full-time member, and are on the waitlist for a private office in the new building. What brought you to Vibe?
MD:
We really wanted to set up our office in a space where we could engage with other like-minded community members. We looked at a few different coworking options in the area, and found that Vibe really aligned the best with our philosophy and needs. We love the commitment Vibe has to environmental issues, and the people that we are interacting with here. The location serves us very well, too.

Vibe: The match between Kitsap Clean as a green, environmentally friendly company, and Vibe’s new building, one of the West Sound region’s most eco-forward to date, is a pretty cool one. What is it about Kitsap Clean that makes you so “green”?
MD: For us, it’s really important to lead with both planet-friendly and people-friendly sustainable practices. On the planet side of things, we try to only use non-toxic cleaning supplies and recycled and compostable products (such as bags). Cleaning “green” takes a bit more effort and elbow-grease, but we really feel that it's important. It makes a huge difference for both for the health and safety of our clients AND that of our employees. We're very careful not to expose them to unnecessary chemicals.

Many of our clients are busy, active people looking to outsource their cleaning in order to be able to do other things with that time, such as spending time with their family.

Vibe: How do you think being at Vibe Coworks will impact your business, and the world of work for local creatives, entrepreneurs and remote workers in Poulsbo and throughout the West Sound Region? 
MD: We are very excited to be part of the Vibe Coworks community and hope that it will allow us to make even more great connections with people with similar interests and concerns. We are so impressed by the commitment Vibe has to environmental issues! We are also very excited to be in the new building once it is finished!
 

Vibe: You’ve talked about Kitsap Clean being a socially responsible employer. Talk to us about what this means, and what the impact has been for your business, your team, and the clients you serve.
MD: Cleaning is hard work. Unfortunately, it’s frequently very poorly paid as well. Many of our competitors only pay minimum wage. At Kitsap Clean, we really strive to create a people-friendly and positive work environment, and have never paid any of our employees less than $15/hour (even during training). Together with bonuses, paid mileage, paid time off and tips from clients, our employees earn a living wage and have the ability to take substantial paid time off. This is something that I’m very proud of.

Paying our team fairly has also meant that professionals stay with us—we have a much lower turnover rate for employees than what is standard for our industry, and our team is happier and more productive overall. It’s great for our clients, too. It means that they have more consistency with the cleaners who are caring for their home and a more positive “vibe” coming from our team members. Many of our clients get to know our team members quite well, which is great.


Vibe: Talk to us about the clients you serve. Are there any favorite stories you can share?
MD:
Many of our clients are busy, active people looking to outsource their cleaning in order to be able to do other things with that time, such as spending time with their family. Financially, hiring a cleaning service makes a lot of sense for many people. We are able to clean much more efficiently than most individuals can since our teams have the tools and the training to do this well. But we really serve a wide variety of clients, including retirees, busy families, and executives. Recently, we started offering our employees an employee discount on our cleaning services—and now several of our employees are now taking advantage of our cleaning service as well!


Vibe: Talk to us about your team. How many people are working with you, what’s their background(s), why do they love working with you, what makes them special?
MD:
Right now we have about a dozen employees and they come from a wide range of backgrounds. Many are moms who are looking to supplement their family’s income while their children are in school or daycare. We only do team cleaning, which means that there are always at least two people on a cleaning job, although for “Deep” and “Moving” cleanings, it isn’t uncommon to have a three or four person team (depending on the size of the job). I would say all our employees have amazing personalities and are very friendly, and are more than willing to chat with our customers about our cleaning processes and products. We also have an office manager, Adriene, who is at Vibe most often and is more than willing to talk to other Vibe members about our business—so don’t be afraid to start up a conversation!


Vibe: If you could offer one piece of advice to other businesses and individuals who are wishing to be more environmentally savvy in their day-to-day, what would it be?
MD:
Little things matter. I think sometimes environmental problems can become overwhelming, given the seriousness of the issues currently facing the planet. But seemingly “small” actions do have an impact. Don’t be discouraged!


VC: On a more personal level, what’s your favorite thing about Kitsap?
MD: It is such a beautiful place—and we should keep it that way!


Vibe: What are you passionate about, beyond work?
MD: I love gardening, and spend quite a bit of time in a pea patch in Battle Point Park on Bainbridge Island! I am also a parent to a very active ten year old, and love to go hiking and camping.


Vibe: Anything else you’d like to share / get off your chest?
MD: Thank you for the opportunity to share our story with the Vibe community!

This one's for you, Poulsbo.

This one's for you, Poulsbo.

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Thank you for naming Vibe Coworks 2017 Emerging Business of the Year.

In 2016, when we first started down this journey to create a space in Poulsbo for our region's most creative, ambitious and community-minded professionals to do their best work, on their own terms, we dreamt big. We envisioned a work+life revolution in Kitsap of epic proportions.

And thanks to all of you, it's a revolution that's happening now.

We opened our temp space, the Vibe Lab on September 26, 2017. Lovingly known as our 'model home', the Lab has become a place for our community of freelancers, commuters, remote workers and entrepreneurs a place to work and convene until construction on our flagship Vibe Coworks Poulsbo location has been completed in early 2018. We're testing out chairs. We're testing out table tops. And we're testing out better ways of living and working right here in Poulsbo—together. (Come by for a visit, yeah? Monday - Friday 8am-5pm!)

Even as most people are still wrapping their heads around coworking—what it is, and how it can transform their personal and professional lives—the response has been overwhelmingly positive. The #1 thing we hear from fellow Vibists? 'I get so much work done here'.

By now, you likely know a bit about our take on the world. At Vibe, we share in a belief that relationships with real people matter. We believe space matters. And we believe in a life where you can be the master of your own worldwide destiny, from right here in Kitsap. 

This award is a recognition of that fact that we’re on to something radically different, collectively loved, and bursting with opportunity for hundreds of Kitsap professionals and their families. Thank you.
— Alanna Imbach, Vibe Cofounder

Above all else, we value diversity of thought, industry and expertise. We believe real innovation happens best when seemingly unlikely people, businesses, nonprofits and partners find themselves working side by side. We don’t care how you dress or what your title is—we only care that you’re passionate about what you do and are eager to be part of a powerhouse creative and professional community.  

We're proud of the flexibility, inspiration and authentic human connections that people are finding at Vibe. People are loving the value and flexibility of our memberships. Our hot desks are hopping, our dedicated desks booked out, and our eight-person conference room has become a happy home for team and client meetings, lunch + learn presentations, webinars, film recordings and more.

Along the way, we've been supported, guided, inspired and energized by what may well be Kitsap's most outstanding collective of visionary do-ers. Our Vibe Founding40 members represent a fantastically diverse range of expertise, rivaled only by the energy and commitment of our founding Corporate Catalysts, the Kitsap Economic Development Alliance, Rice Fergus Miller, Tim Ryan Construction and Western Washington University on the Peninsulas.  

Vibe is a shared workspace and coworking COMMUNITY.  Without you, there would be no 'us'. And that's exactly why we are so honored to have been named 2017 Emerging Business of the Year by the Poulsbo Chamber of Commerce. For us, this award is a recognition of that fact that we're on to something radically different, collectively loved, and bursting with opportunity for hundreds of Kitsap professionals and their families. 

So thank you.

Thank you for believing in us. 
Supporting us.
Investing in us.
Dreaming with us.
Do-ing with us.

Thank you for letting us be part our collective journey towards a happier, healthier way of working + living, right here in Poulsbo.

We couldn't be more proud to be your 2017 Emerging Business of the Year.

 
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WWU places bets on Vibe Coworks

WWU places bets on Vibe Coworks

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Western Washington University on the Peninsulas is the latest to join as a founding member of Vibe Coworks

We're closing out Global Entrepreneurship Week with a bang: proud to announce that Western Washington University on the Peninsulas is the latest to join our line-up of founding members with big ideas on the future of life + work in the West Sound region. (Welcome WWU!)

As a Vibe Corporate Catalyst, Western Washington University on the Peninsulas (WOTP) joins the Kitsap Economic Development Alliance and nearly 40 Founding Members in becoming part of a collective community of visionaries committed to helping create a central hub of resources, ideas and connections at Vibe for the area’s most innovative, entrepreneurial and creative thinkers.

“Universities have a critical role to play in fostering fresh thinking, entrepreneurial activity and cross-sector initiatives," said Vibe Coworks cofounder and CEO, Alanna Imbach. 

"WWU on the Peninsulas shares our vision for fostering a culture of innovation, human connection and high-growth entrepreneurialism here in Poulsbo and beyond. As we close out Global Entrepreneurship Week here at Vibe, we’re delighted to welcome WWU into the Vibe Coworks family as a Corporate Catalyst and are grateful for their early support.”

Vibe Corporate Catalysts and Founding40 members are diverse in perspective and expertise, representing industries ranging from academia to tech and HR, marketing, architecture, health and wellness, nonprofits, design, real estate, copywriting, event planning and more.

“Western Washington University on the Peninsulas (WOTP) is excited to join the community of Corporate Catalysts and the Founding 40 members at Vibe Coworks," said Marlene Harlan, Senior Director West Sound, Western Washington University on the Peninsulas.

We are grateful for the opportunity and value the vision of Vibe Coworks in providing a collaborative working space that not only allows for strengthening community partnerships, but also provides a means for the creation of innovative community programs, resources and networking opportunities.
— Marlene Harlan, WWU on the Peninsulas

"We are grateful for the opportunity and value the vision of Vibe Coworks in providing a collaborative working space that not only allows for strengthening community partnerships, but also provides a means for the creation of innovative community programs, resources and networking opportunities.”

Vibe is a shared workspace and coworking community, offering local creatives and professionals on-demand workspace, meeting rooms, high-speed internet, lounge space, print and mail services and a wide variety of member events including lunch and learns, open office hours, mastermind groups, hackathons, pitch competitions and more.

Vibe operates on a membership basis, with memberships ranging from $35 per day to $415 per month. Meeting rooms are available for booking on an hourly basis to Vibe members and to the general public. Vibe Coworks opened its temporary space, the Vibe Lab on Poulsbo’s 8th Avenue in September. The permanent Vibe Coworks location in Poulsbo is expected to open in early 2018.

Western Washington University on the Peninsulas (WOTP) offers a variety of degree programs, certificate programs, community‐based (non‐credit) opportunities as well as programs for youth grades K‐9.  WOTP’s work on the peninsulas has been advanced through partnerships with Olympic and Peninsula Colleges. By maximizing the strengths of two community colleges and a university, educational and professional pathways have been created, so area residents can complete their educational needs without relocating.

Western Washington University is the highest-ranking public, master’s-granting university in the Pacific Northwest, according to the 2018 U.S. News & World Report college rankings. U.S. News and World Report also ranked Western as the top public university of its type in the West on its list of highly ranked universities that operate most efficiently.

In addition, Washington Monthly Magazine listed Western as the top public master’s-granting university in the Pacific Northwest, as does Money Magazine in its 2016 rankings.

Time out with Kitsap entrepreneur Raquel Pappas

Time out with Kitsap entrepreneur Raquel Pappas

 For Chicago native, Raquel Pappas, taking ownership of  Kitsap Hot Yoga  in 2016 not only marked the start of her own entrepreneurial venture—it also marked the growth of one of the region's most community-centered yoga studios. 

For Chicago native, Raquel Pappas, taking ownership of Kitsap Hot Yoga in 2016 not only marked the start of her own entrepreneurial venture—it also marked the growth of one of the region's most community-centered yoga studios. 

In celebration of Global Entrepreneurship Week, we sat down with Vibe Founding40 member and Poulsbo business owner Raquel Pappas to talk community, leaps of faith and the undeniable impact of the environments we're surrounded by. As if that alone were not enough, we're even more stoked to be talking with Raquel ahead of this Friday's special Global Entrepreneurship Week event, Vinyasa for Visionaries (all welcome!). 

Born and raised in Chicago, with stints living in LA and NYC, Raquel moved to the Pacific Northwest in July 2016 when her boyfriend was stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma. Her 9-5 job with a major payroll and HR solutions company keeps her plenty busy, but—like any good student of Business Entrepreneurship (Raquel's degree is from Loyola Marymount)—working for "the man" just wasn't enough. Entrepreneurship is in her blood. Fast forward to one unexpected encounter with a sign at a closed yoga studio in Poulsbo and the rest, well, is history.

Vibe: You’ve just celebrated your one year anniversary since taking ownership of Kitsap Hot Yoga. That’s an exciting accomplishment. What are some of the things you’ve achieved that you’re most proud of?
RP: Thank you—I am really excited about it! What I am most proud of is the community that has developed here at Kitsap Hot Yoga (KHY). I've cultivated amazing relationships with both local instructors and the yogis in this special place, and seen others build strong connections from coming to classes. Hearing from yoga students that this studio and their practice here has helped them both physically and (even more so) mentally makes me super happy, and proud. I never knew all the amazing things that would come from the start of my personal practice, and I'm proud to be able to spread that to others and foster a yoga community in Kitsap.

The Kitsap Hot Yoga community is so special. Hearing from yoga students that this studio and their practice here has helped them both physically and mentally makes my feel super happy and proud.

Vibe: Tell us about the KHY community and the people who come to KHY to practice. What makes them stand out from the crowd?
RP: The KHY community is so special. People don't just come to get their physical practice in and then get right out. They bring their friends, their family, or build relationships with others in class that they never knew before coming here. So many of the students have amazing passions that they offer to the studio from the kindness of their heart, like photography, flower farming, etc. It's such a dynamic group of people and I genuinely feel that all feel welcome, which was my goal. We have everyone from the young college student, to the mid 20s young professional, to the Navy husband and wife, all the way to grown adults who come from all walks of life with the common value of cultivating health of body and mind... and everything in between! 

Vibe:  KHY has made a name for itself by _____________________. How and why?  
RP: By not being afraid to crank up the heat, and by having an eclectic group of instructors resulting in classes to suit everyone. We have power yoga classes and even hot classes that incorporate weights for those looking to get a hard core workout and sweat in. We have non-heated classes, beginner classes, restorative classes—I love listening to what the community wants and making yoga accessible to everyone who has an interest in trying it out. 

Vibe: What inspired you to own a yoga studio?
RP: Ever since I started yoga in high school, it's been a very personal practice and a consistent passion in my life. I went to college in LA, which was yoga studio galore, with some of the best instructors. It was there that I got even more into yoga. I'd entertained the idea of opening a studio someday in my business classes, but it was always just a thought. After college I followed my dream to go to India and practice yoga there for one month. Right after I returned back to Chicago, a friend was opening a fitness studio and I helped her with the yoga program, which required me to get my actual teacher training. Up until then I just practiced for my own sake, but suddenly I fell into teaching and absolutely loved it. When I moved to WA two years later, I came across Kitsap Hot Yoga which had a sign on the door that it was for sale. Even though I knew very little about the community, I just got this excited feeling that this was the time to make some of my abstract dreams a reality!

The nature of being an entrepreneur or remote worker can be very, very isolating which in turn can be uninspiring and discouraging at times. I thrive in an environment like Vibe where people are passionate, entrepreneurial and encouraged to share ideas.

Vibe: What are the biggest challenges that you face as an entrepreneur and as a business owner? 
RP: I have a full-time job working for another company outside of my small business, so a big challenge I face is having time to make all my ideas into a reality, and having the time and bandwidth to really focus on growing the business. With that being said, I think I thrive on having that mixture of running a business and working for another company—at least for now.

Vibe: As a human, as an entrepreneur and as a business leader, how does the environment that you’re working in impact you and the work that you do?
RP: I thrive in dynamic environments that allow for creativity and are not rigid. I've always been attracted to companies of a creative nature, and also cities/towns where those around me have an open mind. I think that's why I find Kitsap to be a great community to have my studio in. There's not a studio on every corner like there are in major cities, and it [Kitsap] has this really authentic feel where I can really listen to my instincts and feel the freedom to express. I find when I am in a more peaceful, somewhat laid back environment I thrive and have more creativity than I do when I'm in an environment that feels like a rat race. 

Vibe: You're a Founding40 member here at Vibe Coworks. Why did you decide to join? How do you think Vibe will change the world of work for local creatives, entrepreneurs and remote workers in Poulsbo and beyond?
RP: When I heard about the concept, I was instantly inspired and needed to learn more. It goes back to your question about how environment influences my work. I thrive in an environment like Vibe where people are passionate, entrepreneurial and encouraged to share ideas. The nature of being an entrepreneur or remote worker can be very, very isolating which in turn can be uninspiring and discouraging at times. Having a unique place like Vibe Coworks creates a community for these type of people to come and continue their passion in a really positive, forward thinking environment.  I think people will meet here who were just meant to meet and share amazing ideas and make cool things happen!! 

Vibe: In your opinion, what is the future of work?
RP: I think our generation is already a lot more open to alternative work environments and methods of work, rather than the standard 9-5 in an office concept. We'll see a lot more people working from home. What excites me the most is having the ability to take all of your random passions and put them together. That's why coworking is going to be such an important, successful model because even though we are very independent, entepreneurial-focused, we all crave and thrive from authentic connection with others, and physically being around other people rather than solely communicating via technology. 

 Visitors to Kitsap Hot Yoga are welcomed by a hand-painted lotus pose symbol that transcends time and religion. The pose is said to have the power to settle your nerves, awaken your energy and quiet your mind.  

Visitors to Kitsap Hot Yoga are welcomed by a hand-painted lotus pose symbol that transcends time and religion. The pose is said to have the power to settle your nerves, awaken your energy and quiet your mind.  

Vibe: What are you passionate about, beyond work?
RP: Obviously yoga is a true passion of mine and more times than not it doesn't feel like "work" at all. Travel is probably one of my other biggest passions. My parents took [my siblings and me] around the world from a young age, and this curiosity has never left me. I love traveling and truly experiencing new cultures, learning new languages, and of course exploring local foods... food is considered a passion, right?! Finally, the outdoors/nature is another passion... hiking, surfing, snowboarding, and so on, which is why I love it up in the PNW!

Vibe: Speaking of love for the PNW, what’s your favorite thing about Kitsap?
RP: I've lived most of my life in big cities... Chicago, LA, NYC briefly... so at first I was taken aback by the more quiet, quaint pace of life but I've come to really enjoy it. I love that we have such easy access to Seattle which is an amazing city, then to the mountains, the ocean... on top of having really genuine and adventurous people, it's a great combo!!

Vibe: Do you have any superstitious beliefs or rules that you live by?
RP: Hmm... I don't think I'm a very superstitious person but I'll have to think about that! Rules I've come to live by are just allowing yourself to be open to new experiences. I guess I do believe in fate a bit or at least things happening for a reason, like me stumbling upon the sign at the closed yoga studio in Poulsbo and following my instinct to pursue it. You never know where one decision can lead you and it keeps life exciting! 

Vibe: Anything else you’d like to share / get off your chest?
RP: I'd love to just thank the community for being so supportive! If you're curious about yoga at all and haven't tried—you may be surprised what you'll find from it! I look forward to getting to know the amazing individuals in the Vibe community a lot more!

 

 

Vinyasa for Visionaries:
A Vibe x Kitsap Hot Yoga Event
 

Come get your flow on with the Vibe Coworks community as we take time out from the daily grind to quiet our minds, relinquish control and try our hand at yoga together in celebration of Global Entrepreneurship Week. Raquel will be leading us through this special low/no-heat session. Whether you're a practicing regular, or a complete yoga newbie, this escape is for you!

Friday, Nov 17 // 3:30 - 4:30PM
Kitsap Hot Yoga
 20714 State Hwy 305, Suite 3C

RSVP: info@vibecoworks.com
Special $10 rate at the door

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Kitsap celebrates Global Entrepreneurship Week

Kitsap celebrates Global Entrepreneurship Week

Now in its 10th year, Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW) is an international celebration of the innovators and job creators who launch startups that bring ideas to life, drive economic growth and expand human welfare. During one week each November, GEW inspires people everywhere through local, national and global activities designed to help them explore their potential as self-starters and innovators.

This year's event runs November 13 - 19 and you'd better bet we're kind of excited about it, here at Vibe. To mark the occasion, we've organized a full slate of events and activities, in addition to those being put on by other local organizations.

Whether you’re looking to learn new skills, get inspired or just connect with other business owners or aspiring entrepreneurs, there’s sure to be an event that’s perfect for you.

TUESDAY, Nov 14

WEDNESDAY, Nov 15

THURSDAY, Nov 16

  • 7 - 8:50am: Kitsap Economic Development Alliance Tech Committee Meeting (open to all!) // at Paladin
  • 12-1pm: Female Founders Power Hour // at the Vibe Lab
  • 5pm*: Vibe Night Out at the Edg3FUND Live Pitch Competition // meet at the Vibe Lab at 5pm to carpool to the Kitsap Conference Center. Event starts at 5:30pm

FRIDAY, NOV 17

SATURDAY, NOV 19

THROUGHOUT THE WEEK...

  • Special edition Kitsap entrepreneur trivia at 12 locations throughout the county, in partnership with Trivia Time Live
  • 20% off must-have business audiobooks for every aspiring and excelling entrepreneur! Use code VIBE20 to take advantage of this special Global Entrepreneurship Week discount on any (or all!) of these 27 audiobooks Nov 12 - 18. Courtesy of Vibe Founding40 member Nick Johnson and his start-up, Libro.fm

New shared coworking space now open in Poulsbo

New shared coworking space now open in Poulsbo

POULSBO—Vibe Coworks opened its temporary space, the Vibe Lab, in Poulsbo Sept. 26, giving freelancers, commuters, remote workers and entrepreneurs a place to convene until construction on the permanent Vibe Coworks location has been completed in early 2018.

At 5,846 square feet, Vibe Coworks is expected to be the largest coworking space on the Kitsap Peninsula when it opens on 8th Avenue. It will give local professionals a flexible alternative to commuting, long-term leases or distracting home offices.

 Due for completion in early 2018, the flagship Vibe Coworks location in Poulsbo features shared desk space, private offices, meeting rooms, phone booths, a covered deck and bike storage.

Due for completion in early 2018, the flagship Vibe Coworks location in Poulsbo features shared desk space, private offices, meeting rooms, phone booths, a covered deck and bike storage.

Vibe aims to become a hub for the area’s most innovative, entrepreneurial and creative thinkers, Vibe Coworks cofounder and CEO Alanna Imbach said, a “flexible, shared workspace and a central point of exchange among our region’s most forward-thinking professionals.”

The Vibe Lab is located at 19307 8th Ave. NE, Suite C, next door to the future home of Vibe Coworks. The Vibe Lab is a temporary coworking space that offers members their choice of open workspace, a café-style coworking area, dedicated desks, a community kitchen, standing workspace and a fully-equipped eight-person meeting room. Additional amenities include high-speed internet, a staffed welcome desk, unlimited coffee and tea, print and mail services and a variety of member events.

A Vibe Lab launch party is scheduled for 4 p.m. Oct. 12. The event will be free and open to the public, but RSVP is requested at www.facebook.com/events/123663068215424, or via email info@vibecoworks.com.

“Silicon Valley changed the world, and Seattle, Bellevue and Redmond are all driving dramatic, positive change,” Vibe Coworks founding member Brett Eddy said in an announcement of Vibe Lab’s opening. “Why not Kitsap? We’ve always had a high quality of life here, but real growth in technology startups and creative entrepreneurship takes the right mix of energized community, entrepreneur excitement, and creative workspace to make startups successful.

Vibe aims to become a hub for the area’s most innovative, entrepreneurial and creative thinkers: a flexible, shared workspace and a central point of exchange among our region’s most forward-thinking professionals.
— Alanna Imbach, cofounder of Vibe Coworks

”Vibe is striving to create that mix—bringing together the creatives, the programmers, the non-profits, the business incubators into a cool workplace where we want to spend our time, energy, and talent changing the world. I’m happy to see companies like Vibe making a bet here, and now my former company Microsoft too. I believe Vibe Coworks will be a tremendous asset to our community, fostering companies, jobs, and professional opportunities to match our incredible quality of life.”

Nearly 40 founding members have already signed on as Vibe members, representing industries ranging from tech and HR, to marketing, architecture, health and wellness, nonprofit, design, real estate, event planning and more. The Kitsap Economic Development Alliance has also shown its support by becoming the first Vibe Corporate Catalyst.

Vibe operates on a membership basis, with memberships ranging from $35 per day to $415 per month. The meeting room at the Vibe Lab is available for booking on an hourly basis to Vibe members and to the general public. For more information, go to vibecoworks.com.

 

As published in the Kitsap Daily News, Friday, September 29, 2017.

 
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